My Husband Has Diabetes, Can I Still Get Pregnant?

husband has diabetes
husband has diabetes

If your husband has diabetes, and you have been wondering if that could affect your pregnancy, then you have landed on the right page. In this article, we will be taking a deep dive to carefully answer your question, the relationship between diabetes and pregnancy, and what you should do if you are pregnant or planning to get pregnant.

Can my husband’s diabetes affect my pregnancy?

Yes, you can still get pregnant. But it’s essential that you are aware of the risks involved. Your husband needs to control his diabetes before you try to conceive. If he doesn’t, the risk of complications for mother and baby is increased significantly.

The good news is that there are ways to reduce these risks. The bad news is that if your partner has had diabetes for a long time, it may be hard to reverse some of its effects on sperm health and egg quality.

If your partner has Type 1 diabetes (sometimes called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent), this means that his body isn’t able to produce enough insulin on its own (insulin regulates blood sugar). He’ll have to take injections of synthetic insulin every day for life.

It’s unlikely, but not impossible, for a woman with diabetes to get pregnant if her husband has diabetes.

husband has diabetes

You may be wondering how likely it is to get pregnant if your husband has diabetes. The answer is that it’s unlikely, but not impossible.

The risk of pregnancy is low when a woman with diabetes becomes pregnant. Diabetes can affect fertility, which means you won’t ovulate and have an egg for fertilization to occur. However, you may still become pregnant by chance, even with low fertility rates.

The risk of congenital disabilities in children born to women with diabetes is also low compared to the general population; however, there are some things you can do before you start trying to conceive that may help prevent congenital disabilities in your baby:

  • Ask your healthcare provider about taking a prenatal vitamin before beginning insulin therapy or changing your diet if you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes
  • Don’t smoke cigarettes during pregnancy because nicotine and carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke can increase the risk for congenital heart defects (CHDs) and other problems in unborn babies who have been exposed to too much lead found in tobacco products.

If you get proper treatment and the baby is born on time, there’s little chance the baby will have diabetes too.

husband has diabetes

If you have proper treatment and the baby is born on time, there’s little chance the baby will have diabetes too.

If you are pregnant and have diabetes, your obstetrician should be keeping an eye on her health throughout the pregnancy. They will probably advise her to follow a special diet and may prescribe medication to control blood glucose levels. Your partner will also be offered regular appointments with an endocrinologist (a specialist in treating hormones).

The risk of complications during pregnancy increases if her blood glucose levels are poorly controlled. Pregnant women with diabetes are more likely to give birth early, need a cesarean section, or develop preeclampsia (high blood pressure) than those without the condition.

The baby may also have problems such as being large for its gestational age (macrosomia), which can lead to shoulder dystocia at delivery – where the shoulders become stuck behind the pubic bone causing difficulty delivering them through the vagina or if they’re too big for this route then by way of forceps or ventouse extraction (where vacuum cups are applied above each shoulder).

The main risk of a diabetic father having a baby is that there’s a 10% chance that the baby could go blind.

husband has diabetes

The main risk of a diabetic father having a baby is that there’s a 10% chance that the baby could go blind. Other complications include heart defects, club foot, and congenital heart disease.

To avoid these risks, you can control your blood sugar levels by taking medication and making lifestyle changes such as losing weight, exercising more, and eating healthily. If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, it’s important to monitor your child’s development closely from birth onwards so any problems can be picked up early on and treated appropriately.

If you’re concerned about your child’s vision or other symptoms appearing after birth, contact your GP or midwife straight away because treatment needs to start right away, if possible, so it doesn’t cause any long-term damage!

Both parents must manage their diabetes well before and after becoming pregnant.

husband has diabetes

As a parent with diabetes, you are already managing your blood sugar and making sure that you are healthy. While this is important for pregnancy, it’s also critical that both parents manage their diabetes well before and after becoming pregnant.

Pregnancy is a time of extra stress on the body and can make diabetes worse in some ways. The additional stress on the body can cause problems for both you and your baby:

  • You may have more frequent or severe low blood glucose episodes (hypoglycemia). These episodes can be dangerous if they aren’t treated quickly. They may also increase your risk of having a baby with congenital disabilities such as Down syndrome because they lower the amount of oxygen available to your fetus.
  • Your doctor might recommend an additional daily insulin dose during the second half of each trimester when you’re producing more estrogen than usual—another factor that increases your risk of hypoglycemia during this period.
  • If needed, take this extra dose before breakfast every day instead of at bedtime so that it doesn’t interfere with nighttime sleep patterns in either partner; if possible, try not to eat within 30 minutes before taking any nighttime doses unless instructed otherwise by your healthcare provider.

The baby needs to be screened for diabetes at birth and then reviewed regularly over the next three years.

husband has diabetes

The baby needs to be screened for diabetes at birth and then reviewed regularly over the next three years. The first year’s screening is done by a heel prick test (also known as a blood spot test). This can be done anytime during pregnancy or within the first six hours of birth.

In the second year, your child may have another heel prick test, and you’ll need to give them an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between the ages of 18 months and two years of age. An OGTT involves drinking a sweetened liquid that contains 75 grams of glucose, followed by monitoring your child’s blood sugar levels every hour afterwards for up to four hours after they finish drinking it. If they show signs of early type 2 diabetes, further testing will be needed to confirm whether or not they have the disease.

In their third year, you should contact your doctor if your child appears unwell or has any unusual symptoms such as frequent urination (drinking too much), extreme thirstiness (not drinking enough), excessive weight loss, etc. so that these issues can be investigated further through blood tests and other diagnostic procedures like an endoscopy if necessary.

A couple can have a perfectly healthy pregnancy even if they both have diabetes, but they’ll need careful medical management.

husband has diabetes

A couple can have a perfectly healthy pregnancy even if they both have diabetes, but they’ll need careful medical management. Both parents should manage their diabetes well before and after becoming pregnant. The baby may also need special care at birth.

The main risk of a diabetic father having a baby is that there’s a 10% chance that the baby could go blind. In rare cases, the baby may have other congenital disabilities as well.

What can I do to ensure my baby will be healthier?

husband has diabetes

You can have a healthy pregnancy. The best way to care for yourself during pregnancy is to live as healthy a lifestyle as you can.

There are some simple things you can do to help make sure your baby will be as healthy as possible:

  • Get regular medical care during pregnancy, including prenatal visits with your doctor.
  • Eat a balanced diet that includes all the food groups.
  • Don’t smoke, drink alcohol, or use drugs while pregnant. If you smoke, quit before becoming pregnant and don’t start again after giving birth.
  • Stay at a healthy weight before getting pregnant and gain only the recommended amount of weight during your pregnancy. If you’re overweight when you become pregnant, talk with your doctor about ways to lose weight before trying to get pregnant.
  • Exercise regularly — at least 30 minutes most days of the week — especially if you have gestational diabetes or a history of gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies.

Getting pregnant with your husband with diabetes

Yes, you can still become pregnant with a husband who has diabetes. As long as you are healthy and your diabetes is well controlled by medication, there should not be any problems in becoming pregnant.

However, diabetes can cause complications during pregnancy, such as congenital disabilities, so it is crucial that you get checked out by your doctor before trying to conceive.

Author: Bella West